Trapeze Ep. 2

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Trapeze, one of the few anime with potential struggling to stay afloat in the sea of shit that is Fall ’09, still hasn’t lived up to the promise of it’s premise, but the second episode may have been a step in the right direction.

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Well the symbolism was a little more direct this week…

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In fact a lot more direct. Honestly, Trapeze is the only thing besides Blue Literature that has me checking animetake for new episodes this season; the visual style and narratives are so refreshing that I’ll forgive the show even if it turns out not to be a groundbreaking work of art. It’s fairly funny, and it feels relevant in a way that’s very rare in anime, which generally concerns itself with egomaniacs with swords and endless gaggles of schoolgirls. Really, when was the last time you saw a show with a contemporary setting focused on adult characters living realistic (albeit eye-meltingly colorful) lives?

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That said, this guy needs to go. He doesn’t seem to serve any thematic purpose, he just breaks the fourth wall for the sake of breaking the fourth wall. I also hope the show addresses the wackiness of Irabu’s split personality in the near future, not knowing the significance of his changing appearance makes me feel like I’m missing something important in every scene he’s in. Here’s hoping next week’s episode covers that and the crazy self-destructive yakuza guy from the first episode, he looks like he’s got a fun story.

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7 Replies to “Trapeze Ep. 2”

  1. I had to get used to it a bit, but I do like it a lot more, now. You’re completely right about the relevancy thing, too. It’s pretty rare that you’re actually learning some kind of lesson throughout the entire show rather than just watching something with 0 application to your life whatsoever. The information guy is a bit over the top, but he’s tolerable since he at least has a purpose. I mean I’m not sure what he was in the manga, but he’s probably a personification of maybe some footnotes at the bottom of some of the pages.

    1. He was kind of ridiculous in the second episode when he pops in at the end to deliver the theme of the episode deadpan, like we didn’t just watch the damn thing or are too stupid to figure it out for ourselves. And anything he does towards making the show more true to life is kind of offset by the way he breaks the fourth wall and screws with the suspension of disbelief when he appears. I just can’t figure out why he’s there except to annoy me, it’s like he was some little afterthought a writer threw in to eat up a minute or so per episode.

  2. Can’t believe you don’t like Fukuicchi. He’s about the most hilarious element of the show.

    Also, I think focusing so much on the potential “deepness” or “groundbreakiness” of the show is what can ruin it for many. It’s sure aimed for people above 13 who are not orgasming over the new Inuyasha season, but rather than always looking for a hidden meaning, maybe it’s worth to try to see it as a sarcastic remark, or simply a joke.

    1. Sorry to reply so late, but I’m not sure that an anime that can be summed up as a sarcastic remark is significantly more worthwhile than Inuyasha. Not being a cliche piece of shit doesn’t automatically make the show good or worth watching. It’s a nice start, but you’ve got to have follow-through. More to the point, the show seems to take itself pretty seriously, even if it looks goofy the humor isn’t the focus, the patients and their problems are. I don’t think it’s fair to write it off as a joke, so I’m trying to judge it as a fairly serious show about a fairly serious subject.

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