PSYCHO-PASS Ep. 11: The last temptation of Akane

PSYCHO-PASS 1108

Let’s just get right to it.

Plot summary: Shinya defeats Senguji in a duel, but his wounds are too severe to prevent Makishima from taking Yuki hostage. Akane chases after Makishima, who then decides to test our heroine by threatening to kill Yuki. Makishima’s readings are too low for the Dominator to take lethal action, so Akane will have to rely upon a traditional gun to save her friend. Unfortunately, Akane fails to act and Yuki dies.

Notes:

• Before we start things off, just because I snark about something doesn’t mean I’m legitimately complaining about it. Sometimes I’m serious about my remarks, and sometimes my observations are fully tongue-in-cheek. Hey, PSYCHO-PASS is a good show — probably the best show of the season — but I’m not going to change my personality because people really, really like it. If you can’t take some snark in stride, then this just isn’t the right blog for you.

• Akane tossing her coat away at the start… so dramatic.

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• Ginoza: “Strong interference, an underground area that our records say doesn’t exist….” This makes you wonder about the MWPSB’s blind spots. Is it because the villains are outsmarting them? This is certainly more than possible. We’ve seen Makishima do all sorts of things since his introduction into the anime, including complex hacking. He’s the evil genius who’s always one step ahead of everybody. I can’t help but find him to be similar to Nolan’s Joker in both execution and thematic impact, but a lot less charismatic.

But it’s also equally possible that the MWPSB and the larger society as a whole can become… I wouldn’t say complacent, but perhaps they turn a blind eye to unpleasant things. After all, the serenity thing can’t just affect only the civilians. Even government workers, either fearing the effects on their own stress levels or drinking their own kool-aid — so to speak — will ignore problem areas like an entire abandoned section of the city full of unknowns. Why deal with it, they might think, when you can sweep it under the rug and maintain a calm, pretty facade.

• Maybe it’s just me, but I find it odd to see Shusei saunter into a dark room all casually. I guess I’m well-conditioned from watching police procedurals where the cops are always in an alert and ready-to-fight stance. Seeing Shusei walk so upright makes me think he hasn’t been very well trained.

• The Dominator doesn’t exactly make the robot hounds explode, does it? I still wonder if the gun’s effects on living creatures have any sort of thematic relevance.

• Senguji tells a story about how he came to be so sadistic. The most important detail is how he only felt truly alive when guerrilla forces brutally murdered a friend, splattering the friend’s blood and guts all over him. Replaying Senguji’s story over and over in my mind, it makes me wonder why working in dangerous developing countries wouldn’t have been thrilling enough for our cyborg psychopath. Dodging insurgents isn’t thrilling enough? It has to be the death of a friend? Senguji also remarks that this happened about 70 or 80 years ago. Was the serenity problem as bad back then as it is now? Did the serenity problem even exist back then? Why do I ask? Because it seems to me that Makishima is looking for someone to sow chaos within the Sibyl system. Senguji, however, might not even be the product of the system. His murderous need to hunt people as game seems almost tangential to Makishima’s larger cause.

• The setting just seems to consist of random cubes with barrels strewn about:

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Of course, it’s tempting to say that the anime’s creators were just lazy, but I’m not so sure. There’s an almost video game-like quality to how the place is designed. Hell, not just the place; the entire scenario even. After all, the villains keep referring to this as a game. More importantly, however, what I mean is that our setting doesn’t look like a feasible underground area within a metropolis. Instead, it looks like an FPS map designed for deathmatching. Between the cyborg and the robot hounds, I don’t think this is much of a stretch. After all, we’ve got two guys running around literally deathmatching it up. Plus, the show has been about simulation and simulacra, so is it implausible that we now have the real world mimicking video games that are meant to mimic the real world?

It also makes you rethink Senguji’s words when he says he currently feels fully alive. At first, it seemed like a contradiction that hunting human prey would make Senguji feel alive when he’s voluntarily replaced most of his body with cyborg parts. If cyborg parts can replace the human body, why can’t Senguji just hunt robot humans instead of real humans? As such, I labeled our villain a hypocrite. But now, I think the problem is much more complex. The problem with simulacrum is that it resembles the real thing, but there’s something altogether lacking about it. For instance, a realistic video game shows all the blood and guts of murdering the enemy opponent, but you know you didn’t really kill anyone; there’s no visceral impact. So when Senguji hunts human prey in order to feel more alive, he isn’t combating his own loss of humanity. Rather, he wants to make legitimate himself-as-a-simulacrum.

Any gamer out there ever had that feeling where people just don’t take video games as seriously as you do? “Oh, it’s just a game,” they’ll say. Well, it’s safe to say Senguji’s probably spent a lot of money on replacing his body parts with cyborg parts. But at the same time, there is a large amount of skepticism from the world at large: “Why would he do that to himself? How can I take a person seriously if he’s mostly machine? How do I know I’m not talking to a robot?” Two episodes ago, Senguji told us he wanted to transcend the limits of the human body, but what’s the point of doing such a thing if no one takes your new existence seriously? I think his “game,” therefore, isn’t just about making him feel more human. It might still be partly that, but there’s something else to it. Senguji’s game of hunting prey is more about adding weight to the idea that he’s completely remade himself. From what he’s told us, he was probably just some white-collar worker guy who’s never done anything exciting. Maybe he went to a developing country to feel some excitement. Now, Senguji’s turned himself into a legitimate killing machine, but who’s going to take you seriously if you just hunt robots over and over?

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This relates to Sword Art Online somewhat. Before you balk that I would even mention PSYCHO-PASS and SAO in the same sentence, both shows are about simulation (among other things). Instead of living the life he’s been given, Senguji wants to legitimize his existence as a cyborg. As such, he turns his hunting hobby into something with serious consequences. His game isn’t just hunting inconsequential prey; it’s all about hunting humans. No, I’m not saying he’s literally a video gamer, but there are parallels. Instead of facing his real world problems head on, Kirito comes to life in a fantasy world where death becomes real. When people ask, “Why do you throw your life away to an MMO?” Kirito can respond with the fact that not only did he get married in said MMO, he’s watched his friends die in said MMO. The game becomes real. The game doesn’t merely want to mimic reality; it wants to become its own world.

Other parallels: as Kirito becomes immersed in SAO, his real world body falls into a coma. Likewise, Senguji cyberizes or, in other words, digitizes his body most likely to play his game. After all, do you think Senguji would be a very dangerous hunter with his aging human body? In order to hunt his human prey, he has to become a video game-like character that never tires and can shrug off serious wounds with just a medkit. I mean, look at the way Senguji loses an entire arm in this episode and he doesn’t even blink. Of course, I’m not saying that Senguji and Kirito are one and the same. The difference here is that Senguji forces people to play his game whereas Kirito does not. This makes the former a villain, and the latter a reluctant hero.

• Shinya’s not such a bad guy. Look at the way he advises Akane’s friend to get therapy. But since I know in the back of my mind that the show might want to pair Shinya up with Akane, I now have to wonder if he’s only doing so for Akane’s sake.

• Masaoka: “Don’t let your guard down. To call this suspicious would be an understatement.” But… why would Akane let her guard down now? What are you even talking about, old man?

• The old man and Akane hear Yuki screaming out for help. Our pair then find Shinya lying unconscious on the ground. So instead of one person staying behind to look after Shinya while the other goes to look for Yuki, they both decide to forget that they ever heard her scream out. Good cops, these guys.

• Masaoka asks Akane if she can administer first aid, so she says, “I’ve had a few training sessions, but I’ve never actually done it.” Ah, the story of Akane’s life. She’s learned everything, but she doesn’t actually get to do anything. Meanwhile, Yuki…

• Shinya has to remind Akane that her friend was taken away, but she just heard Yuki’s voice!

• Goddammit, Shusei:

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Now nobody’s going to think I came to the conclusion above without the anime spelling it out to me. Why you gotta play me like this, bro? WHY?! But seriously, the anime didn’t have to spell it out. I also want to say that all my observations are done as I am watching the show, so it’s all in chronological order. And yes, I analyze the show without watching it all first. But you don’t have to believe me if you don’t want to.

• Shinya: “My body feels heavy. It doesn’t feel like it belongs to me.” Maybe Shinya’s feeling some guilt in being unable to protect Akane’s friend.

• Masaoka headbutts Shinya… even though the latter still has bullets inside of him.

• Oddly enough, Makishima is “not a target for enforcement action.” But we all know Makishima’s dangerous. Sure, you can say that the System makes its decisions based on data, so why would you rely upon an agent’s judgment over science? But if Makishima can escape the System’s clutches, there has to be something seriously flawed with the System’s methodology. So far, we’ve seen the System recommend death when it shouldn’t have (our first victim), and not recommend death when it should have. I mean, even if Makishima has trained himself not to give off dangerous brain waves or something like that, this would still show that the Sibyl system is, by itself, far from perfect.

• Makishima: “I think the only time people really have value is when they act according to their own will.” Sounds like someone’s been reading too much Sartre. In asking, “…when humans base their lives around Sybil’s Oracle, without ever considering what they really want, do they really hold any value?” Makishima is really invoking the idea of authenticity. I’ve previously discussed existentialism and the problems it entails in an unrelated post, so I’ll just repeat myself:

“The challenge of existentialism implies that an individual’s values and meaning rise from his or her own autonomous will to embody those values; values have no grounding beyond that will. The norm of authenticity suggests that we can confront those values in two ways: inauthentically, as values “one ought to have,” or authentically, as “the values that I choose.” Although one might be perfectly happy and successful in living an inauthentic life, doing so seems to devalue the nature of the autonomous will, at the sake of integrity and (ultimately) of autonomy itself.”

Makishima then tests Akane’s will: can she save her friend without the help of the Sibyl? Wouldn’t that make saving her friend all the more meaningful? But data! Science! It’s actually kind of tragic that Akane seems to be frozen in place. She — like so many others — have been so indoctrinated by the idea that the Sibyl is always correct that she can’t even act of her own accord. She is trembling at the sight of her friend’s suffering, but she’s lost her ability to act according to her own will… or perhaps she’s lost her will. Either way, this is precisely our villain’s point. How can you fight for justice when you live an inauthentic life?

So anyway, we can see how others have failed Makishima. Oryo wasn’t really embodying her own values; she merely co-opted her father’s message in a twisted way. Likewise, Mido relied upon avatars to guide him through life. That’s not exactly a person with an autonomous will worth respecting.

• Our villain goes on to argue that the Sibyl doesn’t factor in a person’s will when making its judgments. It’s almost as though we have for ourselves a classic free will vs. determinism debate. The Dominator can only discern the probability whether a person will become a danger to society. It doesn’t actually know whether or not you’ll commit a crime. So then, is Makishima less inclined to evil but nevertheless willfully commits crime? But what does that even mean? And are there bad guys who are targeted by the Sibyl, but would never actually commit a crime?

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• Also, Akane’s met her foil. Both she and Makishima have always had pure white Psycho-Pass readings. Imagine how great such a thing would be? There’s some truth to the saying, “You either die the hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.” But according to the scanners, that won’t ever happen to Akane. Unlike some people who enter law enforcement, Akane is never in danger of becoming a corrupt cop. She’s the pure beacon of justice that such an organizational body like the MWPSB needs. Recall why Akane chose to enter the Public Safety Bureau in the first place: she was the only person in her class to get an A-ranking for the MWPSB. As a result, she felt “there must have been something that only I could do at the Bureau.” It’s as though there’s a plan for her life — a specific purpose, if you will — and Akane is in search of it.

On the other hand, Makishima rejects that same gift that he and Akane both share. He seems to see it as a burden against his own autonomy. We’ve previously discussed the idea of the Sibyl’s Oracle being a self-fulfilling prophecy. When some civilians get a bad reading, they decide to just go nuts and commit all sorts of heinous crimes (see: the first episode). According to his reading, therefore, Makishima should be always be the saint, the do-gooder, etc. But why should he? Why should he take up the burden of always being the good guy? And from there, he questions why other people should live according to the Sibyl’s Oracle, or in other words, “God’s plan” for everyone.

• I’m sorta impressed that the show had the balls to kill Yuki. Normally, you expect these shows to play softball…

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31 thoughts on “PSYCHO-PASS Ep. 11: The last temptation of Akane

  1. appropriant

    Apparently you did have time to wait for Commie.

    Well, you could argue that the show wasn’t playing “hardball enough” if you consider Yuki’s sliced neck not being shown on screen. Then again, we don’t actually see bodies being cut up and plastinated either. In fact, all we ever see are the overkill goresplosions from the Dominators and Senguji’s shotgun. Maybe there’s a point to why this is in stark contrast to simply slitting someone’s neck with a straight razor.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Apparently you did have time to wait for Commie.

      If I had updated yesterday, I wouldn’t have.

      Well, you could argue that the show wasn’t playing “hardball enough” if you consider Yuki’s sliced neck not being shown on screen.

      That’s not hardball. That’s just gratuitous.

      Reply
  2. joshspeagle

    “I’m sorta impressed that the show had the balls to kill Yuki.”
    I was expecting the Enforcers to show up and rescue her. And then the realization they weren’t coming…But even look back on it, what could the Enforcers have done? All they have are Dominators – it would’ve just been more people to watch the slaughter.

    Also, it possible for Yuki’s death to very much be a gruesome metaphor for Akane’s loss of innocence? Yuki was “innocence” in more ways than one. Shinya even seems to imply (earlier on) that her psycho pass was so clear because she was always optimistic and forward-thinking.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      But even look back on it, what could the Enforcers have done?

      That’s my point though. The fact that it was a hopeless situation just made sense, but you can say that for so many shows. A lot of these other shows, however, will come up with some silly way for the good guys to triumph over evil, so I am honestly surprised Yuki bites the dust, especially after Shinya had initially “saved” the day and how much we had sort of gotten to know Yuki. Sometimes, innocent people will die in anime, but they’re usually relative nobodies.

      Reply
      1. Glombax

        Definitely agree with this. I either expected her to nut up and kill him with the shotgun, starting down some sort of path where she changes, becomes dangerous, or at least her hue starts to darken or I thought another enforcer would come in and do it. But when they started just showing his sibyl value slowly decrease…I was like seriously, they’re going to KILL her!?! Re-watching it now, it might have been tough to hit him with the shotgun without hitting her friend. Still I loved the episode and the direction it takes Akane. Curious to see how they depict the effects on her, whether she’ll harden up or go a little nuts. Also loved the fact that that they showed the complete failure of Sibyl system.

        Reply
  3. Lirael

    What I got from watching the episode is that Sybil uses your…hum…the way people look at things to decide their fates. Basically, it sees/analysis that Makishima is someone that loves life and since it can’t discern will, it comes to the conclusion that a person that loves life wouldn’t want to take out a life. Makishima realized the flaw: he can kill and not be a bad guy in Sybils eyes.

    Maybe I’m wrong, but this explanation for Sybil not attacking him seemed good enough.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Basically, it sees/analysis that Makishima is someone that loves life and since it can’t discern will, it comes to the conclusion that a person that loves life wouldn’t want to take out a life.

      You don’t think someone like Oryo or Senguji love their life?

      Reply
  4. The Real Sugoi Sugoi

    I’m hoping that we’re seeing the beginning of a psychological transformation for Akane.

    It’s sort of a Gen Urobuchi tradition where his most innocent characters undergo serious changes as the show goes on. It happened in Puella Magi Madoka Magica with Sayaka, and it happened in Fate/Zero with Kirei (well, Kirei wasn’t exactly innocent to begin with, but he was an empty individual with no hopes and dreams at the start, sort of similar like how Akane herself is trying to find answers to her life). Both of these characters changed in different ways. I personally think it would be more interesting if Akane goes the Kirei route, should she undergo a psychological transofrm

    Remember the opening credits sequence? It implies that Kogami and Akane will be fighting each other. Also, the Akane we see in the OP video seems cold and almost evil-looking, as opposed to the innocent and moe Akane we have seen throughout the show. Could the images of the OP video be a foreshadowing of what’s going to happen in the show as it progresses?

    Anyway, I’m glad the show is finally getting interesting. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: The first 8-9 episodes of this show could have been condensed into 3-4. This is definitely one of the best shows of the season (my personal number-one pick is Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure), but it took way too long for the main plot to kick in. This slowness is the show’s biggest weakness. I wouldn’t even mind the show’s internal contradictions (many of which you have observantly pointed out) if the show was actually more focused.

    Less world building, more character focus. The more the latter, the better the episodes seem to be.

    Lastly, I hope that there won’t be a season-long break once the twelfth episode has aired. It seems to be a trend right now to do that (with shows like Fate/Zero and Jormungand).

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      The first 8-9 episodes of this show could have been condensed into 3-4.

      I don’t know if you could cut it right in half, but some editing is probably necessary.

      Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure

      I oddly can’t get into it.

      Lastly, I hope that there won’t be a season-long break once the twelfth episode has aired. It seems to be a trend right now to do that (with shows like Fate/Zero and Jormungand).

      Judging by winter’s anime, there doesn’t seem to be much to be watch if this is the case.

      Reply
  5. etery-chan

    I’m sorta impressed that the show had the balls to kill Yuki.
    This is Urobutcher Gen, I wasn’t really surprised that Yuki died…
    It wouldn’t be a surprise even if everybody died, leaving Sinya & Akane & Makishima
    :-D
    Shushei is either a goofy idiot, or he’s really really strong. I don’t remember ever seeing him get tense. I hope it’s the latter one. I like laid back character such as him.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Shushei is either a goofy idiot, or he’s really really strong. I don’t remember ever seeing him get tense.

      Makes you wonder why he’s an enforcer.

      Reply
  6. derpatron

    Was I the only one that noticed that near the beginning, the mechanical hound got a PSYCHO-PASS reading from the Dominator?
    I figure there’s probably some significance in the whole “what constitutes humanity” theme or maybe another imperfection in the Sibyl system?

    Reply
    1. herpatron

      It’s also possible that since the hound was acting on the commands of its owner, the reading was actually a reflection of the owner’s state of mind. Based on the connection between Senguji and his hound, the death of the hound was probably foreshadowing his demise (not that anyone wouldn’t have seen it coming) and ultimately symbolizes the destruction of humanity as we lose more and more of what makes us human to machines. The physical process by which Senguji turns his body into a cyborg is reflective of how society as a whole is gradually losing what defines us as human, both physically and mentally.

      Reply
    2. Caitlyn

      The Dominator gives a “threat assessment” of the dog, not a psychologically-based crime coefficient reading. Completely different figure from what it spits out when pointed at people. The same thing happened in an earlier episode when they used the Dominator to destroy the rampaging industrial robot.

      Reply
  7. Foxy Lady Ayame

    I believe that if the other Enforcers came to the scene, at least one of them wouldn’t hesitate to drop the dominator and shoot with the gun. I really hope that from this death comes sth good. Perhaps a more sane Miki Sayaka? Coz another Madoka me doesn’t want….

    What bothers me besides the dominator being activated to shoot the robotic dog is Makishima’s explanation why he isn’t detectable by the dominators (to the point of getting all the more lower levels of Psycho-pass…). He puts free will as the key-concept, yet isn’t will sth that is part of your psychologic mechanism? Isn’t it also sth produced by chemical reactions in your brain thus possibly countable, too? :/

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      He puts free will as the key-concept, yet isn’t will sth that is part of your psychologic mechanism? Isn’t it also sth produced by chemical reactions in your brain thus possibly countable, too? :/

      It is, but I don’t think the show is being very scientific. It probably posits that free will is something intangible. I believe research shows that that brain makes its decisions before our deliberation is finished.

      Reply
  8. Rae (@CSrae)

    >> Shinya’s not such a bad guy. Look at the way he advises Akane’s friend to get therapy. But since I know in the back of my mind that the show might want to pair Shinya up with Akane, I now have to wonder if he’s only doing so for Akane’s sake.

    I guess so, I keep thinking Kogami just doesn’t want to see someone else become a Enforcer because they were traumatized by the crime compared to the first eps. where he was OK with eliminating the victim.

    >> Good cops, these guys.

    I did wonder about their judgement to let Akane go ahead alone to face the main antagonist of the series as a good idea. I mean, so far I can’t see anyway it’ll end well esp. since he managed to outsmart most of the police already.

    >> I’m sorta impressed that the show had the balls to kill Yuki. Normally, you expect these shows to play softball…

    I was mildly surprised that she ended up dying from Makishima and not shot by Akane by accident. This is a Urobuchi directed story and all ><;

    This could be the turning point where Akane starts questioning the entire P-P system whereas everything else was a build-up to this point.

    Would Akane be considered the MC and Kogami the minor/supporting character? Because it feels like he's the MC and Akane is the minor character from the last few eps.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      I guess so, I keep thinking Kogami just doesn’t want to see someone else become a Enforcer because they were traumatized by the crime compared to the first eps. where he was OK with eliminating the victim.

      The first part was sorta tongue-in-cheek.

      I did wonder about their judgement to let Akane go ahead alone to face the main antagonist of the series as a good idea.

      What I find sorta funny is that Ginoza, Shusei and Yayoi split off to destroy something — I forget exactly what — but it sure didn’t look like they needed all three of them for the task. But of course, the situation was contrived so that Makishima could test Akane. I don’t think realism is too important as a result.

      Would Akane be considered the MC and Kogami the minor/supporting character? Because it feels like he’s the MC and Akane is the minor character from the last few eps.

      Why not both!

      Reply
  9. A Day Without Me

    “…I’m not going to change my personality because people really, really like it. If you can’t take some snark in stride, then this just isn’t the right blog for you.”

    5/5 stars, A+

    Reply
      1. A Day Without Me

        I’m applauding you for finally coming around to the fact that some folks just have no interest in actual dialogue.

        Reply
  10. Nick

    I love your detailed review of this show. I stop by every week to read your posts. Thanks for your insightful thoughts and keep up the great work! This show is hard to watch because of the violence but is very compelling because of the underlying philosophical questions of what constitutes good and evil, the concept of free will and so forth.

    Reply
  11. gaplant

    I’m torn about Makashima just randomly being born with a chronically white psycho-pass, as opposed to either training himself to fool it or by being such a pure undoubting psychopath that the system can’t detect any kind of guilt. If it’s just a fluke, it doesn’t show any basic flaw with the Sybill system. Then again, if it is just a fluke that could happen to anyone, it invalidates Akane’s view of herself as a ‘good person’ which could be pretty juicy too.
    Also, do you figure that psycho pass and psychopath would be pronounced exactly the same by the average japanese viewer?

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Also, do you figure that psycho pass and psychopath would be pronounced exactly the same by the average japanese viewer?

      I can’t really comment on that.

      Reply
  12. s2012k1993

    Curious, I looked up Cymatic Scan, which supposedly reads intentions. I know its psuedoscience, but let’s play with it for a while. Suppose, when one does something that goes against her conscience, her body reacts in a certain way, say releases some kind of brain waves or gives off some kind of body language, which the cymatic scan picks up on. If our basic assumption is that killing is the most repulsive thing on our conscience, then the PP number would be highest just before we kill another person.

    How does conscience tie in with personality, serenity, simulacrum and crime prediction? The stronger our conscience is with respect to some action, the bigger the waves the cymatic scan picks up! I give PP’s science the benefit of the doubt.

    Though a conscience is partly influenced by the environment one lives in, evolutionary psychology claims most of one’s morals judgments are ingrained in one’s genes. One can consciously ignore one’s own conscience and act differently, but that doesn’t change the fact one feels repulsed, i.e. some kind of moral feedback, by one’s actions. I would claim even Senguji showcases his conscience when he says he felt alive when seeing his friend dead. Maybe that subconscious repulsion jolted the life in him and he’s been looking for that thrill his entire life.

    Here we have Makishima claiming that he is leading the authentic life, in the Sartrean sense, which assumes that the self is genuinely free. We know free will in the absolute sense is false. But what about free in the sense that one is free from the serenity of the society and the serenity of the human conscience. I am inclined to think he is a genetic anomaly, one who lacks the conscience we all possess to an extent. The hell with Aristotle’s virtue ethics!

    So what is Makishima really saying? Under this interpretation, he claims to be authentic because his actions are a result of his current sum of life experiences and not some eternal values. Not only that, he proves he is not a hypocrite, since he is willing to get his hands dirty, just like his experiments. Is this a revitalization of Sartrean Existentialism? Truly interesting!

    Reply
  13. meeneecat

    I like how this how isn’t your typical black & white “good vs. evil / hero vs. villain” story line like so many other anime. (yes i know reason for this is that most anime target audience is teenage/young boys). I think the idea of a utopian society actually being a distopian society (“the dream becomes the nightmare”) is very interesting. And the usual conclusion we get from these is that there is no such thing as a perfect society – that we usually end up in hell when we try to recreate heaven. (1984, a well known example). Of course this also depends on where the anime goes from here, it could just decide to be lame and end up going with the whole “good guy vs. bad guy” trope in the end.

    Reply

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