PSYCHO-PASS Ep. 7: A brave, new world

I think the architecture in the opening is as key as what Oryo is saying herself. It is stark and utilitarian; it is without any life or joy. Why? Because it has been designed with maximum efficiency in mind. There are no human flourishes that invite interpretation. The builiding is simply what it is supposed to be: a place for patients to feel serene. This mindset reflects not just the condition afflicting Oryo’s father, but the condition of the world of PSYCHO-PASS itself. At its best, the System is boringly efficient. At its worst, however, it literally renders people inactive and unresponsive. It should come to no surprise, then, when Oryo says, “…[the] pathogen will never be eradicated. This is a disease called serenity…” The emphasis is mine, because I think serenity perfectly captures what Huxley was trying to warn us about: the danger of becoming comfortably numb.

I think the dissatisfaction lies in the fact that the System doesn’t actually put people in the best position to succeed. That’s what it wants you to think, but the truth is that it really puts people in the best position to not fail. And there’s an insidious reason to achieve this sort of serene success. When you aim for the highest of the highs, you may fall woefully short, but when you succeed, you feel as though you’ve achieved it through your very own means. This is the sort of individualism that is endangered in the world of PSYCHO-PASS. By ensuring that you won’t fail, not only will you feel indebted to the System, it also ensures this easily-achieved “serenity” that renders its people too impotent and comfortably numb to rebel. The System is designed in such a way that only the most socially deviant can and will act out.

1984 is the go-to book when it comes to dropping dystopian allusions, but I do think Brave New World has always been the more apt comparison for the direction that our civilization is headed. Consider Oryo’s other words: “They don’t notice anything. They don’t say anything. And they don’t think anything. They are merely a shell of their former selves and soon they will disappear like the melting snow.” By maximizing efficiency, the general populace in PSYCHO-PASS are no different from the humans being used as batteries in The Matrix trilogy. Of course, the System requires your labor. It requires your manpower and obedience to keep its wheels turning for perpetuity. At the same time, everything comes so easily that you are not required to think.

This reminds me of how people will often rage at “ugly” art without understanding that this sort of tension and conflict being expressed by the audience is exactly what a lot of artists are trying to achieve. What simply gives us pleasure will not always invite thought and criticism. Of course, a photorealistic rendering of a human being is technically impressive, but what does it make you think or feel? A lot of artists thus utilize the abstract and the obscene just to invoke a strong reaction from the audience. Sure, I won’t deny that some young artists are easily impressed by the avant garde, and thus attempt to mimic modern art without any thought into its construction. In our contemporary society, “trolling” has become a part of our vernacular, so we see these amateurish attempts as nothing more than artists “trolling” for attention. It thus becomes all too easy for the rest of the movement to be broadly dismissed because we’ve been conditioned to accept only what pleases us, and label inauthentic anything that hopes to challenge this preconception.

Plot summary: Ginoza takes Shinya off the latest case because Ginoza’s a jerk who thinks Shinya’s emotions will get in the way.

As usual, Akane spends most of the episode just trying to understand Shinya. Meanwhile, Oryo continues to murder more and more young girls, and Makishima sits around and hammers us over the head with the story’s meaning.

Notes:

• Oh, the irony in Ginoza’s words: “I can’t allow a detective who can’t put aside his preconceived notions to be a part of the initial investigations.” There’s another key contrast I haven’t really discussed much: the fact that only the Enforcers really think. Ginoza doesn’t have to think. He simply follows the protocol. He simply depends on the System for everything. On the other hand, Shinya might jump to conclusions, but he only does so because he actually comes up with his own conclusions.

• Akane gawking at Shinya’s body might make sense if he actually looked like he had washboard abs and not just a bunch of flesh-colored lumps:

• Just another instance of hyperrealism at play: is Shinya overly aggressive with the training doll because he knows its a robot or because it looks too human? This ambiguity lies at the heart of cyberpunk.

• Shinya: “It’s me who kills a person, not the Dominator. In order to keep that in mind, I have to feel the pain here.” He’s simply repeating what I’ve said at the top of this post. Shinya continues to hone his own fighting skills, because he understands that he cannot allow the System to stamp out his individualism. First, the Dominator allows its wielder to feel no guilt because it determines for its wielder which suspect to apprehend as well as how to apprehend said suspect. The wielder also doesn’t feel responsible because the job is easy; when you don’t have to earn your victory, you don’t feel as though you’ve actually achieved it. The same is true for failures. Finally, it can be said that Shinya simply wants to feel.

Unlike, say, Ginoza, Shinya doesn’t want to be yet another cog in the system. When he apprehends a suspect, he wants to feel it, even if this feeling is nothing more than the pain in his fists. Sure, there’s a certain sadomasochistic streak here, but his desire does make sense on another level. His job has an enormous impact on people’s lives. If Shinya merely becomes a part of the process, he will be alienated to the effect he has on results of his actions. To use another metaphor, the PSYCHO-PASS system and the Dominator make up the assembly line. Those like Ginoza are simply there to ensure that the assembly line continues to operate at max efficiency. Shinya’s need to feel reflects the alienation of the modern assembly line worker, i.e. the need for the craftsman to feel pride in his or her work.

• Akane’s antics seem rather juvenile and ill-befitting of the show. First, her silly “Oops, did I say something I shouldn’t have?” covering of her mouth in an earlier scene, and now, her pointing like a child at Shinya to cover himself up in a shirt.

• Sasayama gropes his female coworkers, but rages at a rapist. Right, you guys just keep pretending that the former is nothing more than harmless fun just because worse things could’ve happened instead. The implications of this juxtaposition is quite apparent even if it’s not intentional.

• Oh, the naivete of teenagers: “I wouldn’t get near something bad from the start.” Yes, you guys are invincible. Nothing bad will ever happen.

• Oryo: “There’s this quote from Kierkegaard that my father liked. ‘Because man is superior to animals, in other words, because man is the self and spirit, man can be in despair.'” I wonder where this exact Kierkegaard quote comes from. Regardless, Kierkegaard was a Christian existentialist, who ultimately believed that despair came from not accepting God’s will, but we don’t have to concern ourselves with that.

We also don’t need to cover all three kinds of despair that Kierkegaard goes into, especially since PSYCHO-PASS itself doesn’t seem specifically Christian at the moment, though this can change as the narrative develops. But why invoke Kierkegaard then? Because it sounds cool on paper? Possibly. But I do think one of the Kierkegaard’s concerns do make sense within the context of the anime, and this is the fear of the Self. In other words, we are distinct from animals because we have the capacity to self-reflect; we have the capacity to distinguish the Self from the world around us. For some people, however, there is this fear of Oneself that can a lead a person to render the Self unnecessary. So how does this all make sense within the narrative of the anime? The System is what makes the Self unnecessary. Remember Oryo’s words from last week’s episode:

“It seems you can’t choose the life you wish. I understand how hard that is. In this era, the System determines everyone’s aptitudes and we all have no choice but to live by it and be satisfied with only a happiness forced upon us… as we are unable to make our real dreams come true. The person you desire to be… Your true worth… Don’t you want to try discovering them?”

In other words, the fear of existentialist despair has led people to rely upon a System that makes unnecessary people’s own ability to choose their own way in life. In other words, the Self is made unnecessary. You’re just another part of the process. Despair is thus not something to be feared, but rather, something to embrace: “Unless you know despair, you cannot know hope.” Despair (and hope) is what sets us apart, after all; the authenticity of the Self is what makes us human. Oryo’s catatonic father knows neither despair nor hope, much less the rest of the population. On the other hand, this fear of choice, i.e. a fear of stress and suffering, leads to this utilitarian, max-efficiency society that renders us less than human. Another way to understand the problem: ask yourself if animals have regrets. Under the rule of the System, however, can a person in PSYCHO-PASS have regrets? To regret, you’d have to feel as though you should’ve chosen otherwise, but does the System give you meaningful choices other than what to wear and what to eat for breakfast?

Sure, you can bring up the fact that Akane’s the exception to the rule since she chose to join the MWPSB when she had other superficial choices before her. I’ll contend, however, that she’s the exceptional archetype. She’s the anomaly who tries to infiltrate the cold, logic-bound system with her compassion and nurturing for others, even robotic simulations. She’s meant to be unique, even if she often acts like a displaced anime heroine.

• Oryo: “My father used dismembered bodies as the subject of many of his drawings. That’s because they symbolize the contradictory nature of the self.” I think the “contradictory nature of the self” refers to the fact that the Self is more than just the body. Our Self — with a capital ‘s’ — is more than the sums of its parts. The maintenance worker from last week marveled at the beauty of the dead girl despite the objective fact that the body has been dismembered and rearranged in an illogical way.

• We could also ignore all these words and just go, “OMG YURI.”

• Makishima: “However, once Psycho-Pass checks became routine, people have found their sense of stress numbed so much that patients who can’t even recognize simulation itself started appearing.” Everything we’ve been discussing over the last couple of weeks can be found in this one sentence: the dangers of the hyperreal, the alienation of the worker, etc.

• Makishima continues to say, “Once that happens, they’re the same as living corpses.” In other words, zombies. If you want to get all sociopolitical, lumpenproletariat is another word you can use. “Soon their autonomic nervous system stops functioning on its own and their vital functions shut down.” In other words, the death of the spirit leads to the death of the body. Our villain rebels against the System by trying to sow chaos and suffering because it ironically brings the system back to life. To combat serenity, he aims to jolt the zombie-like society to life with suffering.

• More evidence of the dying Self: “In this era, everything that could be called a reason for living has died out. No one tries to talk seriously about what life should be like anymore.” It isn’t crazy to think that in a world where a person’s thought process could be quantified, so has the idea of an ideal life been quantified. We’ve defined it; just follow our orders.

• B-but I thought authorial intent was everything: “Well, it’s not uncommon for there to be a disconnect between the creator and the impression their creations give.”

• There’s Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” playing in the background as our two men discuss a horrific topic. I actually find it tacky. I’ve never been impressed when other shows have done the same thing, e.g. trying to make nursery rhymes seem creepy. The irony here has become so passe and unsubtle.

• In terms of storytelling, however, this part of the episode is a disaster. It’s literally the villains just sitting there, telling you the entire gist of the story: “This is what it means, folks!” Show, not tell! It isn’t that difficult!

• The clunky storytelling continues: “You guys prepare toys, and we, mischievous children, use those toys to shake up society.” This is rather disappointing, but I guess I can’t be too surprised. After all, this is the same writer who felt that the breakdown of the symbolic order should be represented by literally guts and fecal matter.

• Another example of cyberpunk is the new guy disguising himself as a schoolgirl with a hologram. The blurring of the lines between the sexes is another persistent source of ambiguity in the genre.

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27 thoughts on “PSYCHO-PASS Ep. 7: A brave, new world

  1. s2012k1993

    The Kierkegaard quote is from one of the few books he wrote under his own name: The Sickness Unto Death. Kierkegaard’s despair is different from the existentialist despair of the 20th century. For Kierkegaard, the self is made up of contradicting parts: the infinitude, the finite; the concrete, the temporal; freedom, necessity. Despair is one’s inability to have a proper relation to the self, i.e, one is not able to balance the contradictions in the self. Only after all this analysis does Kierkegaard bring God as the only one who can balance the contradictions in oneself. But his analysis of despair in itself can be viewed separately from his faith-based solution to despair. Though they don’t acknowledge Kierkegaard, Sartre and Camus take inspiration from Kierkegaard in trying to understand the dichotomy of the unconscious and conscious parts of the self.

    Humanity is always in despair according to Kierkegaard, but not always conscious of it. Oryo believes her father’s art uncovered the ugliness of humanity, helping humanity become conscious of its despair, the first step in coming to terms with despair.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      To be frank, I’m not sure how your comment relates to what I’ve written other than to tell me which book the quote comes from.

      Reply
      1. s2012k1993

        Both Oryo and you are misinterpreting despair as an emotion (hopefully Gen isn’t). Despair is the conflict over not being able to balance the contradictory parts of the self. Oryo’s father, I think, didn’t bind himself to the system to drive away regrets or fears (he seemed to have an ‘illustrative career’ and knew exactly what he wanted with his art). But he did have a conflict, his art and his morality, and sought the system as a way to solve it. His solution is similar to Kierkegaard’s solution of faith in God to address this dilemma, except Oryo’s father places his faith in the system. From what we have observed the system solves the contradiction by eradicating a part of the self, regressing humanity to something akin to animals.

        It’s clear that Oryo doesn’t have this conflict between art and morality like her father did before the system. But ironically, she is no better than her ‘dead’ father after he accepted the system because she rejects the morality part of her. Whereas her father rejected the gruesomeness of human nature, Oryo rejects the morality in human nature; both reject the despair over balancing the two and instead regress to almost an animalistic state of being. This, of course, is just one analysis of the problem of being authentic.

        P.S. Did you add extra material surrounding the Kierkegaard quote to your post? Or was I just exhausted from the three hour long dinner I had yesterday?

        Reply
        1. E Minor Post author

          Both Oryo and you are misinterpreting despair as an emotion

          Where did I call it an emotion? I implied that autonomy leads to despair, and that people were afraid of this despair — they are afraid to be autonomous — not that the existential despair itself was a fear or any other emotion. It’s clear to me that the writer is targeting Kierkegaard’s second type of despair:

          The second type of despair is refusing to accept the self outside of immediacy; only defining the self by immediate, finite terms. This is the state in which one realizes that one has a self, but wishes to lose this painful awareness by arranging one’s finite life so as to make the realization unnecessary.

          As for regrets, that’s a bit of extrapolation on my part. Autonomy also implies moral responsibility, and I suspect that many people in the world of Psycho-Pass are absolving themselves of moral responsibility by giving up their autonomy to the System. However,

          Oryo’s father, I think, didn’t bind himself to the system to drive away regrets or fears

          …I never said that Oryo’s father gave himself to the system to drive away regrets. I also think you’re being a little pedantic about my usage of ‘fear.’ If the realization of the Self is painful, and people seek to avoid that, I don’t think it’s out of the question to call it a fear of the Self, a fear of this painful awareness. What I’m frustrated about your two comments is that we both arrive at pretty much the same conclusion, i.e. Oryo’s father felt that the Self leads to suffering, so he sought to destroy the Self through the System, but you insist that I’m wrong.

          Whatever, that’s how it goes.

          P.S. Did you add extra material surrounding the Kierkegaard quote to your post? Or was I just exhausted from the three hour long dinner I had yesterday?

          No. The only thing I’ve added to the post is the very bottom bullet point.

  2. Roghek

    Psycho-pass surely likes its exposition, I don’t though.

    On a side note, probably the most amusing part probably was Akane staring at Shinya’s body and his “Is there something on my face?”

    Anyway back to what you wrote, is such a shame I’m not familiar with 1984 nor Brave New World, so there is no way I’m going to get the references. Still it was good to know more about the point of view of the antagonists. However I couldn’t find it that interesting.

    So far the show has only shown us how imperfect the whole Psycho-pass universe is, how nobody is happy and though it might seem perfect from the point of view of the characters (we are told this in P-P favourite way of showing/telling things) and I’m not to sure what they want to do with it.

    There is no way we can side with the criminals who rebel against the system not the system. The police force is not on the right either, though from a moral standpoint, we could “accept” the system which seems like the lesser of two evils. What I meant by “I’m not sure what they want to do with it” is that even if this uto/dystopia seemed interesting at the beginning, making every single episode about the system’s shortcomings kills the interest after a few episodes.

    The characters are interesting though, in the villains case, their depth and motives are dependants on their angst towards said system (Is there another word beside system, this is getting repetitive). The police force is more interesting, for example Shinya’s character is being bases on his dead friend, now that’s interesting. Well I think that’s all I have to say and sorry for just word vomiting in your post, I don’t think I generated much discussion, I can blame my illiterate self for that.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      So far the show has only shown us how imperfect the whole Psycho-pass universe is, how nobody is happy

      Well, that’s a dystopia. No one’s supposed to be happy in such a world.

      There is no way we can side with the criminals who rebel against the system not the system.

      Well, I don’t know about that. Bane is the villain of the latest Batman movie, but I’d call him the tragic hero. I don’t know much about Makishima at the moment, so I can’t judge whether or not he’s the same sort of character. But I wouldn’t rule out the possibility of siding with him.

      making every single episode about the system’s shortcomings kills the interest after a few episodes.

      Well, for me, the show tickles a certain intellectual itch. The storytelling is subpar though.

      Reply
  3. himitsuhanazono

    Again on Akane’s female gaze at Shinya: sure it’s corny and feels out of place, but I suspect it is one of the show’s attempts to bring out the conflict. Since all they’ve got is holographic attires, maybe she’s never looked at a genuine male body? It comes out rather…naive though, like a third-rate shoujo drama.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Since all they’ve got is holographic attires, maybe she’s never looked at a genuine male body?

      This would be a cool idea to expand upon… like maybe there are brothels where the customer can customize a hologram’s “assets.” But that’s an aside… as for the scene itself, it’s plausible that Akane might just be genuinely curious about seeing a male body up close, but the show never really plays it up because she gives her droopy-eyed look as usual.

      Reply
  4. The Real Sugoi Sugoi

    > Sasayama gropes his female coworkers, but rages at a rapist. Right, you guys just keep pretending that the former is nothing more than harmless fun just because worse things could’ve happened instead. The implications of this juxtaposition is quite apparent even if it’s not intentional.

    Oh, Japanese patriarchy. And don’t forget, someone who does that is considered “amusing” (in the words of Shinya). This sexism is so deeply ingrained that sexism comes out even unintentionally. Well, as one of the characters in Psycho-Pass that you quoted says in this episode, “Well, it’s not uncommon for there to be a disconnect between the creator and the impression their creations give.” ;)

    > Our villain rebels against the System by trying to sow chaos and suffering because it ironically brings the system back to life. To combat serenity, he aims to jolt the zombie-like society to life with suffering.

    Still, none of this explains the significance of Orwell and 1984 though. It aggravates me. Was it shown to make a reference to the individuality-crushing nature of totalitarian surveillance states? I hope the symbolism goes a little deeper than that. Namedropping philosophers like Rousseau, Plato and Orwell for the sake of namedropping is so middlebrow.

    > In terms of storytelling, however, this part of the episode is a disaster. It’s literally the villains just sitting there, telling you the entire gist of the story: “This is what it means, folks!” Show, not tell! It isn’t that difficult!

    Gen does that a lot. There are several episodes in Fate/Zero where you see two people talking to each other in an underground room for minutes at a time. It’s just telling, not showing. I really hate it when screenplay writers do that. Television a fucking visual medium, not a novel. Having extended dialogues where characters explain history and stuff is fine in a novel, but not in a film or a TV episode.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      This sexism is so deeply ingrained that sexism comes out even unintentionally.

      It feels like the sort of shit you see in corporate environments all the time.

      Still, none of this explains the significance of Orwell and 1984 though.

      I don’t think you’re going to get any detailed or labored significance. 1984 is a classic that just rears its head anytime there’s a dystopian story.

      Television a fucking visual medium, not a novel. Having extended dialogues where characters explain history and stuff is fine in a novel, but not in a film or a TV episode.

      I think it’s part laziness, part the writer being enamored with his “message.” Like, this message is so fucking gold that I can’t afford for it to fly over my viewers’ heads. Trust me, it’s worth it if I just spell it out to you!

      Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      I just automatically assume you’re referring to BTOOOM! because that’s how sad it is, but hell, if rape actually showed up elsewhere, I can’t say I would be all that surprised.

      Reply
      1. The Real Sugoi Sugoi

        Yeah, BTOOOM!

        You should have a drinking game. From now on, whenever anime mentions absurdities along the lines of “purity” or depicts/fetishizes rape, take a shot. It would make the anime viewing experience more fun, I reckon.

        Reply
        1. etery-chan

          There is no rape. Instead, the show stated it once again, the message it wants to get across, “All men are evil and scum.” LOL.

          I thought the drinking game is for SAO? One shot for Kirito saying horrible thing to women.

  5. etery-chan

    This anime / system has risen a serious question to me? Isn’t that holographic technology given to the citizen by the dictator government? Or, at least, they are fully aware of it. How come they don’t prepare a countermeasure to see through everything? Don’t they have special scanners to unveil the hologram? How could some rat face disguise himself as a school girl so easily? You would think that the school gate / school dorm / important crossroad would have the special scanner to identify every students. This is fucked up. What if the sexy bishounen I slept with last night turned out to be a fat ass otaku? LOL.

    Oh yeah, my favorite moment was when Shinya asked, “Is there something on my face?”
    Dude, she’s looking at your naked, sexy body. Slurp.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Isn’t that holographic technology given to the citizen by the dictator government?

      Maybe not for students.

      How could some rat face disguise himself as a school girl so easily?

      Maybe he isn’t a permanent resident of the dorms. Or maybe it’s anime logic.

      Oh yeah, my favorite moment was when Shinya asked, “Is there something on my face?”

      I dunno, maybe he was being sarcastic.

      Reply
  6. Ian Caronia

    “This is rather disappointing, but I guess I can’t be too surprised. After all, this is the same writer who felt that the breakdown of the symbolic order should be represented by literally guts and fecal matter.”
    Huh?

    ….OH SHIT! It’s written by the same guy who made loli womb fucking!! Hahaha~!
    Wow, I never would’ve guessed. I mean, I guess I could’ve seen a bit of a connection from how much unneeded exposition there is half the time in this show, but I just guessed that was a Japanese thing.

    I’ve noticed that with Japanese mysteries and the like: ridiculous amounts of exposition. It’s as if the writer is afraid no one will understand the story and subtly, so they go out of their way to rehash what’s happened every few steps and point out what was already subtly conveyed. I think their problem is they’re afraid of failure. If you write well enough then you will attract those who understand your work, and it’s those reader/viewers you should be looking for. No one wants an idiot reading a mystery. That kind of combination has no value for either the reader or the writer. Yet, the author either thinks their story is too complex to be understood (which doesn’t happen so long as there is coherence) or that they are -too- smart for anyone to get them (which is just insufferable). Ultimately all this needless exposition hurts what’s been written, as you’ve seen, yet Japanese anime writers keep doing it!
    -It’s kind of ironic that way. They fear that they’ll fail to reach anyone so they cram in exposition to make things simpler, only to fail by bogging down their story with exposition as a result of their fear.

    Have to say PSYCHO-PASS is still eons ahead of Saya no Uta, though. I mean, at least this show takes hold of it’s potential and doesn’t have an abundance of stupidity clouding what could be an interesting plot. And there’s no loli womb fucking, which is always a plus.
    …I’ll never let that go, Urobuchi.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      Have to say PSYCHO-PASS is still eons ahead of Saya no Uta, though.

      Well, I still think it’s the best show this season has to offer. It’s just a sad state of affairs though when the best show this season has to offer is also full of missteps and poor storytelling. This says a lot about the rest of this season’s shows.

      Reply
      1. buwwle

        It’s competent and above average at the very least don’t you think? It could be worse like those pandering harem or those faux dark seinen shows (BTOOM)

        Reply
  7. Rae (@CSrae)

    >Oh, the naivete of teenagers: “I wouldn’t get near something bad from the start.” Yes, you guys are invincible. Nothing bad will ever happen.

    I thought it was odd that she’d tell her friend to ask Oryo esp. when she thought Oryo looked suspicious in the first place. Wouldn’t it be sensible to instead say “avoid Oryo”?

    I could have missed this, but did Oryo’s father commit the previous murders and now his daughter continuing the crime? I knew he painted disturbing images, but no one directly said he was linked to the unsolved case.

    >The implications of this juxtaposition is quite apparent even if it’s not intentional.
    True, I thought it was strange memory to bring up =/ The story isn’t what I’d call “amusing.”

    Also, what exactly was the Academy in the first place if they had a operating room underground? Seems like a random addition to the building .–.

    Reply
    1. E Minor Post author

      I thought it was odd that she’d tell her friend to ask Oryo esp. when she thought Oryo looked suspicious in the first place. Wouldn’t it be sensible to instead say “avoid Oryo”?

      Suspicious, but perhaps she doesn’t quite realize that Oryo is also dangerous.

      I could have missed this, but did Oryo’s father commit the previous murders and now his daughter continuing the crime?

      I don’t think so. I think Oryo’s father was a moral person who had a dark side to his Self that he couldn’t reconcile with. Art served as an outlet until he realized he could just rely upon the System to destroy his Self entirely. Oryo will say she’s trying to enlighten the world by continuing his work, but I think she’s just trying to commit revenge in her twisted, little way. I guess you could say she merely has daddy issues, which is kind of disappointing in a way.

      Also, what exactly was the Academy in the first place if they had a operating room underground?

      It wasn’t originally an operating room. It was a boiler room that people simply forgot about, but the villains have now repurposed it as their operating room.

      Reply
  8. weslea

    Honestly, the abs scene confused me. It seems like fanservice, but… the whole reason she’s even there is to apologise for looking up Kougami’s history like it’s some great invasion of privacy, and then she just nonchalantly gawks at his abs and doesn’t react when he asks her what she’s doing? Am I missing some subtext or what…?

    Reply

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